Vaccines meet big data: State-ofthe- Art and future prospects. From the classical 3is ("isolate-inactivate- inject") vaccinology 1.0 to vaccinology 3.0, vaccinomics, and Beyond: A historical overview

Bragazzi, N.L. and Gianfredi, V. and Villarini, M. and Rosselli, R. and Nasr, A. and Hussein, A. and Martini, M. and Behzadifar, M. (2018) Vaccines meet big data: State-ofthe- Art and future prospects. From the classical 3is ("isolate-inactivate- inject") vaccinology 1.0 to vaccinology 3.0, vaccinomics, and Beyond: A historical overview. Frontiers in Public Health, 6.

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Vaccines meet big data State-ofthe- Art and future prospects. From the classical 3is (isolate-inactivate- inject) vaccinology 1.0 to vaccinology 3.0, vaccinomics, and Beyond A historical overview.pdf

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Abstract

Vaccines are public health interventions aimed at preventing infections-related mortality, morbidity, and disability. While vaccines have been successfully designed for those infectious diseases preventable by preexisting neutralizing specific antibodies, for other communicable diseases, additional immunological mechanisms should be elicited to achieve a full protection. "New vaccines" are particularly urgent in the nowadays society, in which economic growth, globalization, and immigration are leading to the emergence/ reemergence of old and new infectious agents at the animal-human interface. Conventional vaccinology (the so-called "vaccinology 1.0") was officially born in 1796 thanks to the contribution of Edward Jenner. Entering the twenty-first century, vaccinology has shifted from a classical discipline in which serendipity and the Pasteurian principle of the three Is (isolate, inactivate, and inject) played a major role to a science, characterized by a rational design and plan ("vaccinology 3.0"). This shift has been possible thanks to Big Data, characterized by different dimensions, such as high volume, velocity, and variety of data. Big Data sources include new cutting-edge, high-throughput technologies, electronic registries, social media, and social networks, among others. The current mini-review aims at exploring the potential roles as well as pitfalls and challenges of Big Data in shaping the future vaccinology, moving toward a tailored and personalized vaccine design and administration. © 2018 Bragazzi, Gianfredi, Villarini, Rosselli, Nasr, Hussein, Martini and Behzadifar.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: cited By 0
Subjects: QW Microbiology. Immunology
Depositing User: eprints admin
Date Deposited: 05 Aug 2018 04:44
Last Modified: 02 Sep 2019 09:46
URI: http://eprints.iums.ac.ir/id/eprint/610

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