Surface modification of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles by d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate as potential carrier for the delivery of drugs to the brain

Jalali, N. and Moztarzadeh, F. and Mozafari, M. and Asgari, S. and Motevalian, M. and Alhosseini, S.N. (2011) Surface modification of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) nanoparticles by d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate as potential carrier for the delivery of drugs to the brain. Colloids and Surfaces A: Physicochemical and Engineering Aspects, 392 (1). pp. 335-342.

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Abstract

The potential health benefits of vitamin E (d-α-tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinate, TPGS), particularly, in curing of the neurological symptoms associated with vitamin E deficiency have been reported. Hence, vitamin E containing carriers for delivery of drugs to the brain might be useful from different points of view. Herein, in order to obtain desired surface morphology and particle size of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) and high emulsifying effects, TPGS-modified PLGA NPs were optimized as a potential carrier for the delivery of drugs to the brain. The particle sizes, surface morphology, phase composition correlated with different emulsifiers and different stirring times were characterized. Also, the in vitro cytotoxicity of the samples using PC12 cell line was investigated. According to the obtained results, by increasing the percentages of TPGS, the average particle size decreased and the distribution of particle diameters came closer by further addition, and the larger particles did not create. In addition, no obvious cytotoxicity was observed at various TPGS amounts, and the modified PLGA NPs were considered biocompatible since they show little decrease in cellular viability. With the increase of TPGS ratio, more effective in vitro therapeutic effects could be observed, which achieved the highest cell viability, because the degradation of NPs may release the most amounts of TPGS components that have synergistic activity. Furthermore, it was found that TPGS as a water-soluble derivative of natural source of vitamin E could be a perfect emulsifier for making PLGA NPs as potential carrier for delivery of drugs to the brain. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: cited By 25
Uncontrolled Keywords: Brain; Cell culture; Drug delivery; Emulsification; Glycols; Morphology; Nanoparticles; Particle size; Polyethylene glycols; Polyethylenes; Surface treatment; Thermoplastics, Average particle size; Carrier; Cell viability; Cellular viability; Distribution of particles; Emulsifying effect; In-vitro; Natural sources; Neurological symptoms; PC12 cells; PLGA nanoparticles; Poly-lactide-co-glycolide; Potential health; Stirring time; Synergistic activity; Therapeutic effects; Tocopheryl polyethylene glycol 1000 succinates; Vitamin E TPGS; Vitamin-E, Surface morphology, nanoparticle; polyglactin; tocofersolan, article; biocompatibility; cell strain; cell viability; cytotoxicity; drug delivery system; drug release; hydrophobicity; in vitro study; particle size; priority journal; surface property
Subjects: QU Biochemistry. Cell Biology and Genetics
QV Pharmacology
Depositing User: somayeh pourmorteza
Date Deposited: 05 Jan 2019 08:12
Last Modified: 05 Jan 2019 08:12
URI: http://eprints.iums.ac.ir/id/eprint/7319

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